Roy Jones Wife, Age, & Net Worth – Biography

Roy Jones Wife, Age, & Net Worth – Biography

Roy Jones Wife, Age, & Net Worth – Biography – Roy Levesta Jones Jr. is an American born Russian citizen. A former professional boxer, boxing commentator, boxing trainer, rapper, and actor who holds dual American and Russian citizenship.

Roy Jones Jr

Roy Jones Wife, Age, & Net Worth – Biography

Real name: Roy Levesta Jones Jr.
Nickname(s): Junior, Superman, RJ, Captain Hook
Weight(s): Middleweight, Super middleweight, Light heavyweight, Cruiserweight, Heavyweight
Height: 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Reach: 74 in (188 cm)
Nationality: American, Russian
Born/Date of Birth: January 16, 1969
Place of Birth: Pensacola, Florida, United States
Occupation(s): rapper, actor, promoter, sports commentator
Genres:  Hip hop, Southern hip hop, crunk
Labels:  Body Head Entertainment
Spouse: Natlyn Jones
 
Stance:  Orthodox
  Boxing record
 
Total fights: 75
 
Wins: 66
 
Wins by KO: 47
 
Losses: 9
 
Read more: Jeremy Roenick

 

Early years


Roy Jones Jr. was born to a family with a boxing tradition. His father, Roy Jones Sr., a Vietnam war veteran who was awarded a Bronze Star for valor after he rescued another soldier, was also a middleweight boxer. Roy Jones Sr. fought Marvin Hagler on June 10, 1977 (which happened to be Hagler’s 36th pro fight,) on the undercard of the Sugar Ray Leonard vs. Vinnie DeBarros fight. Hagler, underrated throughout his entire career, knocked Jones Sr. out in the third round and received $1,500 to Leonard’s $50,000.

 

Amateur career

Jones won the 1984 United States National Junior Olympics in the 119 lb (54 kg) weight division, the 1986 United States National Golden Gloves in the 139 lb (63 kg) division, and the 1987 United States National Golden Gloves in the 156 lb (71 kg) division. As an amateur, he ended his career with a 121–13 record.

 

Professional career
Early years
On turning professional, he had already sparred with many professional boxers, including NABF Champion Ronnie Essett, IBF Champion Lindell Holmes and Sugar Ray Leonard. Jones began as a professional on May 6, 1989, knocking out Ricky Randall in two rounds in Pensacola at the Bayfront Auditorium. For his next fight, he faced the more experienced Stephan Johnson in Atlantic City, beating him by a knockout in round eight.

 

Middleweight champion
Roy Jones vs. Bernard Hopkins
Jones made his first attempt at a world title on May 22, 1993. He beat future Undisputed middleweight champion Bernard Hopkins by unanimous decision in Washington, D.C. to capture the IBF middleweight championship. Jones was ahead on all three judges scorecards (116-112 three times). Jones landed 206 of 594 punches (35%) and Hopkins connected on 153 of 670 (23%). Jones claimed he had entered the bout with a broken right hand, but still managed to outpoint Hopkins and secure a unanimous decision win. Jones reminded the world of this claim on his hit single “Ya’ll Must’ve Forgot” later in his career.

For his next fight, he fought another future world champion, Thulane “Sugar Boy” Malinga, in a non-title affair. Jones beat Malinga by knockout in six rounds. Jones finished the year with another win, beating Fermin Chirino by decision. In 1994, Jones beat Danny “Popeye” Garcia by knockout in six, then retained his IBF title against Thomas Tate in two rounds at Las Vegas on May 27.

Super middleweight champion
Roy Jones vs. James Toney
On November 18, 1994, Jones was set to face undefeated IBF super middleweight Champion James Toney, who was ranked highly in the “pound for pound” rankings. Toney was undefeated after 46 bouts and was rated the best in the world at 168 lbs. Billed as “The Uncivil War”, Toney vs. Jones was heavily hyped and on PPV. Jones, for the first time in his career, was the underdog.

 

Light heavyweight champion
Roy Jones vs Mike McCallum
In November 1996 at Ice Palace, Tampa, Florida, Jones defeated 40-year-old former three-weight world champion Mike McCallum via a shutout decision (120-107, 3 times) before a crowd of 12,000, to win the vacant Interim WBC Light Heavyweight title. Jones scored a knockdown just before the bell at the end of round 10. Jones landed 254 of 535 punches (47%) throughout the 12 rounds and McCallum connected on 209 of 651 (32%) Jones was soon upgraded to full champion by the WBC when former titlist Fabrice Tiozzo moved up to cruiserweight. Jones made $2.8 million from the fight and McCallum got $750,000.

 

Return to light heavyweight
Roy Jones vs. Antonio Tarver
Jones chose to return to the light heavyweight division and on November 8, 2003 he defeated Antonio Tarver to retain the WBA (Super), IBO and The Ring Light Heavyweight Championships, and to win Tarver’s WBC title. Jones appeared a lot weaker after coming back down to the light heavyweight division, losing the muscle he gained for the heavyweight fight seemed to have taken a toll on his aging body and his cat-like reflexes appeared diminished. Jones won by majority decision, the judges giving him 117–111, 116–112 and 114–114.

Fall from grace
Roy Jones vs. Antonio Tarver II
On May 15, 2004, Jones faced Tarver in a rematch. Jones was heavily favored to win, but Tarver knocked him down at 1:31 of the second round. Jones had won the first round (Tarver only landed two punches in the first round), but in the second, as Jones tried a combination, he was caught by a big counter left hook from Tarver. Jones got on his feet by the count, but for the first time in his career was ruled unable to continue by referee Jay Nady.

Roy Jones vs. Glen Johnson
On September 25, 2004, Jones attempted to win the IBF light heavyweight title from Glen Johnson in a match in Memphis, Tennessee. Johnson knocked out Jones 49 seconds into the ninth round. Jones lay on the canvas for three minutes after being counted out. Johnson was ahead on all three judges’ scorecards at the time of the knockout (77–75, 77–75, 78–74) and had landed 118 punches to Jones’s 75. Jones used the ring’s canvas that night as a billboard for his upcoming rap CD, which came out November 1.

Roy Jones vs. Antonio Tarver III
After almost a year away from the ring, focusing on training and working as an analyst for HBO Boxing, Jones scheduled a third fight with Antonio Tarver, on October 1, 2005, a sellout crowd of 20,895 at the St. Pete Times Forum in Tampa, Florida, which aired on HBO PPV. For only the second time in his career, Jones was considered an underdog going into the fight.

 

Fallout with HBO
After the loss in the third Tarver bout, Jones resumed his duties as a commentator for HBO World Championship Boxing, calling the Floyd Mayweather Jr.–Sharmba Mitchell fight on November 19, 2005, and the Jermain Taylor–Bernard Hopkins rematch on December 3, 2005. His return to the network was short lived, as Jones was let go from his ringside analyst role in January 2006. HBO cited his reported lack of commitment to attending the network’s production meetings.

Comeback trail
Back to winning ways
Jones took on Prince Badi Ajamu (25-2-1, 14 KOs) on July 29, 2006, at the Qwest Arena in Boise, Idaho. Jones defeated Ajamu by a unanimous decision (119-106, 3 times), winning the WBO NABO light heavyweight title. Ajamu won the first round on all three official scorecards, however it was the only round he won. Ajamu also lost two points for repeated low blows in round seven and one more in round eight.

Next up for Jones was the undefeated 29 year old Anthony Hanshaw (24-0-1, 14 KOs), on July 14, 2007, at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Mississippi. Hanshaw was ranked 11th by the IBF at super middleweight. Hanshaw was knocked down in the 11th round. Jones won the bout by unanimous decision (114-113, 117-110, 118-109) to claim the vacant International Boxing Council light heavyweight title.

Roy Jones vs. Félix Trinidad
On January 19, 2008, Jones faced former 147 and 154 pound five-time world champion Félix Trinidad at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The bout was fought at a catchweight of 170 lbs. Jones had a noticeable size and speed advantage, and in round seven, a short right hand to the temple dropped Trinidad to his knees. Jones fired a combination in the tenth round to send Trinidad down once more. Jones won the fight by scores of 117–109 and 116–110 (twice). This was the first time a former heavyweight champion returned to fight successfully at 170 lbs. The fight generated 500,000 pay-per-view buys and $25 million in domestic television revenue. This was also the last fight of Trinidad’s career.

Roy Jones vs. Joe Calzaghe
After Joe Calzaghe’s split from promoter Frank Warren, it was officially announced that Roy Jones Jr. and Joe Calzaghe had reached an agreement to fight for The Ring Light Heavyweight Championship in New York City at Madison Square Garden on September 20, 2008 on HBO PPV. However, Calzaghe claimed injury to his right hand in training, so the fight had to be postponed a couple of weeks, with November 8 being set as the new date.

 

Roy Jones vs. Omar Sheika
It was announced that Jones would next fight Omar Sheika (27-8, 18 KOs) on March 21, 2009, at the Civic Center, Pensacola, Florida. Jones defeated Sheika via fifth-round technical knockout to claim the vacant WBO NABO light heavyweight title. The fight was the main event of a pay-per-view titled “March Badness”, which included both boxing and mixed martial arts matches. Sheika had previously defeated Glen Johnson, who had knocked out Jones in 2004 and came into this fight having lost six of his last ten bouts. It was only his second fight since September 2005. Jones came in ranked as the #6 light heavyweight in the world by The Ring.

Roy Jones vs. Jeff Lacy
On August 15, 2009, Jones beat former super middleweight champion Jeff Lacy (25-2, 17 KOs) in 10 rounds after Lacy’s corner stopped the fight. The fight, billed as “Hook City”, going off the boxers nicknames of ‘Captain Hook’ and ‘Left Hook’, took place at the Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Mississippi. Lacy had never been knocked out or stopped before. Lacy had tried to pin Jones on the ropes throughout the fight, but Jones was unaffected by the tactic and seemed more worried about playing to the crowd than about Lacy’s punches. There was a discussion in Lacy’s corner after the ninth round about stopping it, but Lacy, convinced his team to give him another round. Jones landed 249 of 500 punches (50%) while Lacy connected on 104 of 429 (24%). Jones was ahead on all three judges scorecards at the time of stoppage (99-91, 100-89, 98-92).

 

Roy Jones vs. Danny Green
In December 2009, Roy Jones was set to face Australian boxer Danny Green in Sydney, Australia. In the weeks leading up to this fight, there were reports in the newspapers indicating difficulties getting Roy’s sparring partners into Australia. Then on December 2, 2009, following an extensive pre-fight delay due to hand wrap protests, Danny Green defeated Jones via first-round TKO. Jones was initially gracious in his humbling defeat, stating that “We don’t make excuses, it was a great performance by Danny.” However, less than a month later, Jones would launch a formal complaint, accusing Green of using illegal hand wraps and demanding his loss be overturned, though the decision was upheld. Though Jones’ rematch with Hopkins looked to be in trouble following Jones’ loss, the two sides would officially come to an agreement in February 2010 for an April 3 bout.

Roy Jones vs. Bernard Hopkins II
Roy Jones Jr. and Bernard Hopkins (50-5-1, 32 KOs) met in a rematch bout, on April 3, 2010 at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, 17 years after their first fight. Jones entered with a record of 5-5 in his previous ten bouts dating back to May 2004 whilst Hopkins came in 4-1 since June 2006. After going the distance, Hopkins was awarded with a unanimous decision (118-109, 117-110 twice). Hopkins landed 184 of 526 punches (35%), while Jones connected on 82 of 274 (30%). Hopkins collapsed to his knees in his dressing room, drained from a brutal fight and exhausted by the end of his 17-year wait for revenge against Jones. The fight generated 150,000 pay-per-view buys.

Roy Jones vs. Denis Lebedev
In February 2011, Vladimir Hryunov confirmed that negotiations were taking place for Denis Lebedev (21-1, 16 KOs) to fight Jones in Moscow. Lebedev had just come off a controversial split decision loss to Marco Huck. At the time, Lebedev was ranked #4 at cruiserweight by The Ring. On 24 March, a deal had been agreed which would see Jones earn a $500,000 purse. The fight, a 10-round bout, which was billed as the “Battle of Two Empires” was announced to take place on May 22 at Dynamo Palace of Sports in Krylatskoye. 2,000 tickets were reportedly sold on the day of release. The promoters expected a sell out.

 

Cruiserweight
Roy Jones vs. Max Alexander
Jones won a 10-round unanimous decision against Max Alexander on December 10, 2011, in Atlanta, snapping a three-match losing streak, and winning the Universal Boxing Organisation (UBO) Intercontinental cruiserweight championship. The three judges scored the bout all in Jones’ favour (100-90, 100-90 & 99-91). Jones rarely pressed over the first seven rounds, but put together several combinations in the eighth and 10th rounds to beat Alexander. After the fight, Jones said, “I’m feeling wonderful. I want a cruiserweight title, the world title”, said Jones, who weighed in at 189 pounds. “This is just a start. I’m not through yet.” The fight was aired live on Internet PPV channel Ustream for $9.99.

Roy Jones vs. Paweł Głażewski
Jones was due to fight Polish boxer Dawid Kostecki (39-1, 25 KOs) in a ten-round bout at Atlas Arena, Poland on June 30. Days before the fight, Kostecki was arrested on June 19 in order to begin serving a 2 and a half year prison sentence for a prior conviction of running a prostitution ring. Jones negotiated his deal with 12 Knockout Promotions, the fight’s promoter, he was assured that Kostecki would not start serving his sentence until after the fight. 12 Knockout Promotions tried to secure a temporary release for Kostecki but were unsuccessful. Paweł Głażewski (17-0, 4 KOs), who was on standby all week, stepped in as a replacement. Jones defeated Głażewski by split decision (96-93, 94-95 & 96-94). There was some controversy from the decision. Many believed due to Jones being lined up to challenge then-WBC cruiserweight champion Krzysztof Włodarczyk, he was given the decision.

Roy Jones vs. Zine Eddine Benmakhlouf
On December 21, 2013, Jones defeated Zine Eddine Benmakhlouf (17-3-1, 8 KOs) by unanimous decision for the vacant WBU cruiserweight title at the Dynamo Palace of Sports in Krylatskoye in Moscow, Russia. The fight was billed as a “Winner Takes All” match, with the winner receiving the entire purse. Benmakhlouf took a knee after Jones wobbled him with a left hook early in the third round. The judges scored the bout 120-108, 119-109 and 118-111.

Miscellaneous fights
Jones, fighting at the Ķīpsala International Exhibition Centre in Latvia, defeated Courtney Fry (18-5-0) via RTD in the 5th round on July 26, 2014. Jones was ahead on all three judges scorecards by the end of the fourth round, (50-44, 50-44 & 50-45). On September 26, 2014, Jones defeated Hany Atiyo via 1st-round KO after 75 seconds. This fight took place in front of a sold-out crowd at The Basket Hall in Krasnodar, Russia. This was a second straight stoppage and fifth consecutive victory for Jones. Jones’ next bout, for the first time 4 years, took place in USA at the Cabarrus Arena in Concord, North Carolina and ultimately saw him defeat Willy Williams via 2nd-round TKO. Near the end of the same month on March 28, Jones was again back in the ring, this time against Paul Vasquez (10-6-1, 3 KOs), defeating him via 1st-round TKO for the WBU (German Version) cruiserweight title at the Pensacola Bay Center in Florida. On August 16, 2015, Jones scored his 62nd professional victory and 45th knockout win by defeating Eric Watkins via 6th-round KO.

 

Personal life
Jones was born in Pensacola, Florida, to two very different parents. His mother, Carol, was warm and easy-going, whereas his father, Roy Sr., was much like a Marine Drill Instructor with respect to his son. A decorated Vietnam veteran, ex-club fighter and retired aircraft engineer who had taken up hog farming, Roy Sr. was harsh on his son from early on, taunting the child, “sparring” with him, enraging on him, yelling at him and abusing him, often for 20 minutes at a time. This behavior never really changed; if anything it became more brutal as Roy Jr. grew up. Many people would call Roy’s father’s treatment out-and-out abuse, but he believed he had a good reason for it: to make Roy Jr. tough enough to be a champion. In this pursuit, he was relentless and Roy Jr. lived in constant fear of his father’s verbal and physical violence against him.

 

Fighting style
Jones was known for his unique and unorthodox fighting style that defied many of boxing’s oldest traditions. His style relied heavily on his great hand speed, quickness, reflexes, ring IQ and knockout power which were often the deciding factors in most of his fights during his prime. He had such hand speed that he could often throw hooks in rapid succession. He was nicknamed “Captain Hook”, because he would deliver four or five hooks in a row from different angles. But he would also mix it up with a variety of punches to keep his opponents guessing.

 

Music career
Jones started his rap music career in 2001 with his album, titled Round One: The Album and the debut single, “Y’All Must’ve Forgot”. In 2004, Jones formed a group, Body Head Bangerz and released an album. The album, Body Head Bangerz: Volume One, featured B.G., Juvenile, Bun B of UGK, Petey Pablo, Lil’ Flip and Mike Jones among others. From 1)Wikipedia,

 

References   [ + ]

1. Wikipedia

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